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DSA Events held
4th edition of the Africa Health Congress
Denim For Diabetes - Corporate Day
Denim For Diabetes - School Day
Durban Lifestyle Meetings
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Durban
0861 222 717
East London
082 327 1571
Kimberley
082 923 4620
Lenasia
011 852 5773
National Office
086 111 3913
Pietermaritzburg
033 346 0934
Port Elizabeth
082 579 9059
Pretoria
083 574 0959
Western Cape
021 425 4440

TYPES OF DIABETES

There are three main types of diabetes:

Type 1 diabetes - occurs when the pancreas stops producing insulin. It usually starts in young people under the age of 30, including very young children and infants, and the onset is sudden and dramatic. People who have type 1 diabetes must inject insulin to survive. Insulin dosages are carefully balanced with food intake and exercise programmes. 

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Type 2 diabetes - is caused when the insulin, which the pancreas produces, is either not enough or does not work properly. Approximately 85 - 90% of all people with diabetes are type 2, and many people who have this condition are undiagnosed.

Most type 2's are over 40. They are usually overweight and do not exercise. Type 2 diabetes may be treated successfully without medication. Often loss of weight alone will reduce glucose levels. Eating patterns and exercise play important roles in management. Tablets may be prescribed to help improve control, however, many type 2's will eventually use insulin.

Although type 2 is, in itself, not life threatening, in many ways it is more dangerous than type 1, as it's onset is gradual and hard to detect. High blood glucose levels over a long period of time can cause serious damage to the delicate parts of the body and lead to blindness, heart attack\stroke, kidney failure, impotence and amputation. 

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Gestational diabetes - is a temporary condition that occurs during pregnancy. Both mother and child have an increased risk of developing diabetes in the future.


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